4 Steps to Up-cyle a Trader Joe’s Bag to a Trendy Paper Storage Bag

For a #FridayFinds post a few weeks ago, I mentioned the new paper bag trend. Initially, I was confused. Why are white paper bags cool? Why are they all over Pinterest? And why are they selling all over Etsy? 
If I had to guess, I’d say these are the new fabric cubes and bins. Maybe the reason they’re becoming popular is that storage solutions can be pricey, and this is a way to reuse what you already have. I’m still not sure why someone would buy one, but with some paint, I’m planning to DIY some Trader Joe’s bags and use them for storage in my closets. They do have a cool texture, and you can customize them easily. 

You will need: 

  • Trader Joe’s bags
  • Paint – I used white, gold, copper, and black to decorate mine
  • Foam brushes
Step 1: Paint your bag white. I think the white paint on the craft paper texture almost looks like canvas when it’s dry.
 
Step 2: Decorate your bag. This is the fun part! I looked at paper storage bags on Pinterest, like the ones I included in this post above, for my inspiration. For my first one, I painted copper metallic crosses.
Step 3: Fold down the top of the bag. This is by far the hardest part – I couldn’t seem to do it without tearing the top of the bag a bit. My only advice is to roll slowly, giving it a good crease now and then, and use some tape if it tears too noticeably. 
Step 4: Fill and display!
I had so many ideas for more bag designs – I made three more from Trader Joe’s bags, and then painted a few other smaller paper bags as well. I love how the metallic ones turned out!

The metallic ones are my favorite. 
What am I going to use these for? What WON’T I use them for? Currently, I’m using two in the linen closet to hold washcloths and extra toiletries, and one to hold craft supplies. I might use some of the smaller ones for some plants. I’ll post it on Instagram when I find them all a home 🙂 
So, what do you think of the paper storage bag trend? Are you in?

DIY: Make Your Own Tasseled Fabric Banner Wall Hanging in An Afternoon

Every time I passed that Target end cap, the cute spring banners almost jumped into my basket of their own accord. But somehow, every time one thought compelled me to put them back on the shelf, the thought that “I could make this!” 
It’s a thought that can often lead an enthusiastic crafter astray. But fear not – today’s project really is as easy as they come, and the end results can’t be beat! You can make these banners with any phrase of importance to you – honestly, that’s the hardest part, just narrowing down the quote options!
Once you’ve decided, you’ll be able to whip up a couple of these in one afternoon. Here’s what you’ll need: 
  • White cotton fabric – or really, any color of cotton fabric! For your message to be most readable, I recommend keeping it a solid color.
  • Scissors and a ruler
  • A piece of copy paper for your pattern
  • Craft glue
  • Sharpie paint pens, or fabric paint, or a metalic fabric marker, like the copper one I used, that I bought at Joanns. Here’s the closest paint I could find on Amazon.
  • A small stick from the backyard, or wood skewers, like you’d use for grilling
  • Embroidery thread for tassels and hanging
  • Pencil, or water soluble pen

Step 1: Make your pattern by marking the center of your piece of paper, and using your ruler to measure up the sides of the paper and connect the dots to mark the triangle sections you’ll cut off.

Step 2: Fold your fabric over so that you can cut out two identical pieces at the same time, and place your banner pattern on top. Then, cut out the two pieces.

Step 3: Glue the two pieces together, staying very close to the edges. Glue all the edges together except for the top – leave the top of banner open, so that when the glue dries, you can turn the whole thing inside out. Yes, you could sew the edges, but ain’t nobody got time for that.

Step 4: While the glue is drying, make some tassels! These are super easy. Just wrap some thread around your fingers until you have the thickness you’d like.

Slide the thread off your hand, and tie a small piece of thread around it, like so. This will be the top of your tassel.

Then, wrap thread around the tassel a small distance from the top, and tie the ends of the thread together to secure it.

Cut the loop at the bottom of the tassel, and fluff up the threads.

Super easy! Here’s another tutorial, just in case.

Step 5: Now that your glue hem has dried, turn the banner inside out to have nice finished edges. Add some glue to the top edge, and fold it over. This will be the back of the banner.

Step 6: Cut two 1 inch wide strips of fabric, and fold them in half. Then glue the ends down to the back of the banner.

Step 7: Now for the fun part! Write your message or draw your design on the front of your banner. I drew mine on paper first, and traced it onto the fabric with the light from a window. I used a water soluble pen, so I could just dab off the blue after I was finished with the painting.

I traced the letters on one banner with my copper fabric marker, and use my gold Sharpie paint pen on the other. I LOVE how both turned out!

Step 8: I did break out the needle and thread to sew on the tassels. Just a couple stitches through the top should do it.

Step 9: Then I slid one banner onto a wooden skewer, after cutting off the pointy end. I hung the other one from a stick from the backyard – a stick that had a previous life as a wizard wand. I tied some embroidery thread to the stick and the skewer for hanging.

This was so much more satisfying than just buying a cheap banner from Target! I’m officially hooked. I’d love to try embroidering on one next, or using navy blue fabric with white fabric paint, or experimenting with pompoms and tassels. There’s so many options, I just might need one in every room!
What did you think of this craft? If you liked it, pin it or share it!
Some of the links in this post are affiliate links, which means that when you purchase something, I made a little percentage. Thanks for supporting my craft habit!

DIY: Make Your State Wall Art

Home.

Can I wax contemplative for a minute? Home is both where I’m from and also where I am now. My Midwestern roots feel less like home in some ways, now that I’ve lived in a major city for almost seven years. I’ve found that living in a city changes you – the way you see the world shifts to a wider angle lens as you come into contact with a vast variety of perspectives. At the same time, I’ve felt more homesick for the Midwest over the last couple years than I have in the entire time we’ve lived in Arizona, because once I had Edison, I realized just how important roots are for support. Sometimes I feel like a branch with a heavy burden tied to it, that’s just been stuck in the dirt, struggling to stay upright.

But as I mentioned a couple weeks ago, I’m working on this whole “rooted” thing by reading This is Where You Belong: The Art and Science of Loving the Place You Live. One of the practical takeaways so far has been that people who love where they live act like they love it – just think of “Don’t mess with Texas” pride. People who love where they live do things to take care of their place and show a sense of ownership. I’m pretty sure that Texans are the only people to get tattoos of their state on their bodies.

I’m not ready for that level of commitment yet, but I did want to pay tribute to my roots as well as all the amazing experiences and adventures Arizona has brought me in the last seven years – pretty much all of which I’ve documented on this blog, in fact!

At a local mom-made craft and business fair (side note: another habit of people who love where they live is shopping locally) I bought this wooden outline of Iowa for about $6. As soon as I got home, I started kicking myself for not getting a matching one of Arizona. But then, I realized that this was the perfect opportunity to figure out how to DIY one – no scroll saw required! And, it only cost a few cents to make!

You will need:

  • A square piece of wood, or a square canvas for your background. I happened to have some leftover square pieces of wood from our kitchen shelf project.
  • White paint for covering your wood or canvas background.
  • Sandpaper. This is optional, if you like the distressed farmhouse look. 
  • Metal picture hanging bracket.
  • Super glue. I used Loctite 411 because it’s what I found in the garage.
  • Balsa wood – I got a piece large enough to make 5 or six states for $5 at Joanns.
  • Craft knife.
  • Watercolor paint in black and brown (you’ll see why!).
Step 1: Paint your square piece of wood or canvas white and let it dry. I also painted the edges of mine copper, because … copper. 

Step 2: Sand your piece of wood if you’d like a distressed farmhouse look. 

Step 3: Use your super glue to attach the metal bracket to the back. I know what you’re thinking, but yes, this Loctite 411 glue will absolutely hold. It’s crazy strong, and this was much easier to me than trying to find little nails to attach the bracket, but you could go that route if you really wanted.

Step 4: Google “*Your state here* outline” and print off one of the options. I found one of Arizona that matched the size of the Iowa one perfectly.

Step 5: Cut out your state, and place it over your piece of balsa wood. Trace around it with a pencil, and cut it out with your craft knife. I cut out two, so that I could match the thickness of the purchased Iowa cutout.

Step 6: Carefully sand the edges if they’re a bit rough. Balsa wood is extremely soft, so proceed with caution. Glue your pieces together if you’re doubling up like I did. I used Elmer’s glue, and put a book on top of the state while it was drying so that it didn’t bow.

Step 7: Now it’s time to break out the watercolors. Make a dark brown mixture, and paint the edges of your state. This gives it a lovely wood-burned effect.

Smudge the edges with your brush to mimic the effect of wood-burning, basically allowing the super dark edges to bleed over a bit. Then, wet the surface of the state with your brush, and go over it with a light brown wash.

It looks a little dark initially, but it will dry lighter. Place a book, or something flat and heavy, on top to prevent bowing while it dries.

Step 8: Glue your states onto your canvas or wood background! I used good old Elmer’s for this again. Once it dries, you’re ready to hang your art!
Now this wall begins with where we’re from, ends with where we are, and has some aspirational locations in the middle. 
I still have plenty of balsa wood left, and used mostly things I already had, so this project probably cost me less than a dollar to make! 
If you were going to make state art, what state would you choose? Let me know in the comments below or on social media!

How to DIY a Rose Gold Anthropologie Hurricane

I first saw these rose gold metal hurricanes in Anthropologie around Mother’s Day last year, and Brian bought me the tiniest one for a Mother’s Day gift. The largest ones cost $52, but they’re currently sold out.
If you, like me, can’t spend $52 on such an item and missed your opportunity to get it, this post is for you. Well, if you’re willing to put in the work to make it. But since you’re reading this post, I’m going to take that as a yes.
You’ll need: 

 This is what I started with: a $20 light fixture from Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore. I bought this originally for the insides of the light fixture, to DIY my own light fixture for the dining room, but I was able to put the glass to good use!

Step 1: Take out the innards. Brian helped me with this, because I was initially having a hard time figuring out how it came apart. When it’s done, you’ll have this: 
Set aside the light fixture innards for your future project. 
Then, Cover all the exterior glass with painters’ tape, like so. It’s tedious, but very important to get the glass well covered, with a good edge along the metal. It will save you a lot of time on the clean up!
After your glass is taped, Use a scrap of cardboard to block off the inside. You’ll have to cut it just a little larger than the opening, and fit it inside just below the rim. I neglected to do this, which as you’ll see, was not a good idea. I highly recommend learning from my mistake!

Put on a coat of spray paint primer. This will help the paint adhere to the metal. Notice in the photo above, the top of the glass is not covered. I didn’t realize how much spray paint would actually get inside, and guess what – it’s A LOT. So make sure you do cover the opening.

Also a tip I learned from watching DIY videos on YouTube – spray painting inside a cardboard box helps keep the paint contained, and protects what you’re painting from wind and dust.

Follow up with a coat or two of copper spray paint.

Once it’s dry to the touch, start carefully peeling off your painters tape. The sooner you remove the tape, the easier it will be to have a good clean edge. This step is super satisfying!

Clean off any paint on the glass with a scraper. This step took the longest for me, because I had to scrape down the entire inside of the thing, due to not blocking off the opening. 
The paint came off with the tape in a couple places, so that’s what you need the additional bottle of metallic paint for – just touch up areas that need it. 
Add candles, moss, stones, lights, succulents, flowers, or whatever suits you, and place it somewhere it can be admired by all. 
I’d guess this cost me $12 in paint, if I wasn’t using paint I already had, and $10 for the light fixture, since I’m using half of it for another project.
The tiny hurricane is the one I bought from Anthro, and I think the two of them together look like they were always meant to be!

3 Easy Upcycles You Can Make This Weekend

When you work full time and have a one and a half year old, crafting time happens in pockets at night and on weekends. Which means that projects I can start on a Saturday morning and actually complete by evening are super satisfying. Times that by three, and you’ll feel like you rule the craft world!

1. Marble Fridge Magnets

Up-cycle your old fridge magnets! For this super simple project, you’ll need:

  • A sheet of hexagon marble tiles. After looking at Home Depot, I bought these from Amazon. They were the perfect size, and the price couldn’t be beat!
  • A hot glue gun.
  • Magnets. I used my cheap old fridge magnets from Target. 

I hot-glued the old magnets to the back of the marble tiles. The one thing you’ll need to test is the strength of the magnets. I’d tried to upcycle some of those old flimsy old fridge magnets that have advertisements for restaurants, etc. on them, but they weren’t strong enough. 
Here’s the fridge before/during the magnet testing phase: 

 And after!

I love the little touch of elegance they add!

2. Paper Straw Diamond Mobile

This is one of those crafts I’d pinned ages ago, bought the supplies, made an attempt, and failed. The straws cluttered up my craft supplies drawer for months. Then one day, after watching some DIY videos on YouTube completely unrelated, I had a flash of inspiration and realized I could do this in an easier way – hot glue.

Here’s my original inspiration, from Sugar and Cloth:

This is what I started with – a tangled mess of straws tied together.

Here’s what you need:

  • Paper straws. I bought these at Target in the dollar section.
  • Hot glue gun.
  • Scissors, and string for hanging.

As described in the original tutorial linked above, for various sizes of diamonds, you’ll need different sized pieces. I ended up adding to the pieces you see here, so there were a total of:

  • five 6 1/4″ straws
  • five 5 1/2″ straws
  • ten 3 1/2″ straws

Here’s the premise: instead of stringing the straws together, we’re going to hot glue them. Hot glue dries so fast, and is malleable for a minute, it seemed plausible that this would work.

Start by gluing together a triangle with two long pieces and one medium piece.

Then we’re going to start to assemble the pentagon shape of medium pieces, with the long pieces forming triangles along the sides and connecting at the top.

Yay! The top section is done!

To add the rest of the diamond shape, it’s easiest to lay it on it’s side, and glue the pieces one by one. 
Clean up the glue by just breaking off any excess. 
Add some string for hanging, or use it as a decorative item!


3. Upcycled Lamps

Before:
Note the tiny lamp on the right in the first photo:  it, and the taller version, were a super cheap Walmart buys when Brian and I first got married and moved into our very first apartment. They’re nothing special, so I considered donating them and getting something with a little more flair. And then I had a light-bulb moment, and realized that they were perfect candidates for a spray paint upgrade! 
Now, spray painted lamps can go one of two ways – tacky, or awesome. There’s not much in between. So I did my research when it came to gold spray paint, and I decided to try two different types to see what the effects were. 
This paint was SO easy to use, I loved it! I had much more control over the paint, and my hand didn’t get tired and cramped. It was easy to get a super even and smooth finish, and I liked the final color of the gold, not too yellow or two orangey. 
This paint has your typical spray nozzle, and typical pitfalls – you have to be careful to control the amount of paint, not let it drip, etc. The hammered finish helps disguise any drips, and looks really cool.
As it turned out, I needed some lamps in my office at work, so I didn’t have to rely on horrible florescent lights. Here’s how the Universal Gold turned out: 

Here’s the Hammered Gold lamp: 

Between the two, I’d probably use the Universal Gold again before I’d use the Hammered Gold again. But for just the right project, the hammered gold could be the perfect effect. 
I also tried spray painting the lampshade on the small lamp – but if you’re going to attempt that, be sure to vacuum them off really well first. 
As far as actual steps for painting the lamps: tape off the cords, placing them in a plastic bag like I did, and taping off the top where the light bulb will go. Follow the drying instructions on your spray paint, but seriously, without priming, these turned out fantastic and were done in a day. 
And that’s it! Three easy DIY projects you can start, and probably complete, in a day. While you’re waiting for your first coat of spray paint to dry, you can be hot-gluing your magnets or straws!
Now you have no excuse – get crafting!

How to Make Baby Joggers From a Tee Shirt

It finally got too cold for shorts here in Phoenix, so joggers were a natural progression. I love that they’re stretchy and allow for plenty of running, crawling, and climbing.
Edison’s hoodie in the photos above, if you’re curious, is from A Quiver Full. Use the code “JESUS” for 20% off!
This project has been sitting on my Pinterest board for ages, and I finally did it! If my photos and directions below don’t make sense, check out the original tutorial I followed here. These really do take half an hour, or less! I made two pairs during one nap-time.

You will need: 

  • An adult tee shirt. I used an old shirt from Loft. 
  • 1/2 wide elastic for the waistband.
  • Paper for your pattern. 
  • A sewing machine and thread, scissors, etc.

Step 1: Make your pattern. On a large piece of paper, mark the waistband of the pants, and then the crotch, and then the ends of the legs on your paper, and fill in the sides. Add an inch to the top, because this will be folded over to make your waistband. Add a half inch around the edge, for your seam. Your patter should look a little more square than the pair of pants you’re tracing.

Step Two: Cut out your pieces.  Place your tee shirt on a flat surface, making sure the hem lines up. Then pin your pattern to the tee, lining up the legs with the bottom of the shirt (I didn’t get the left leg lined up perfectly, but ideally, they should both line up). Then cut through both layers of the tee.

Step Three: Turn the pieces so the right sides are together. Then, sew a quarter inch seam around the pant legs.

Step 4: Fold over your waistband, and sew down the edge, leaving a gap of a couple inches for putting in the elastic.

Step Five: Going off of the existing pair of pants you used for your pattern, measure your elastic and cut it to that size. Push a safety pin through one end, and then feed it through the hole you left in the waistband, and pull all the way through. 

Once you have the elastic all the way through, you’ll need to sew the ends of the elastic together. fold them over each other, and sew a few lines up and down to tack them together. Above, I’ve done it on a second pair of pants. Getting the elastic under the sewing machine is probably the most tricky part of this whole thing.


Step Six: Once the elastic is back inside, sew the gap closed, and turn right side out. 
Tada! Happy Christmas crafting! And enjoy some more photos of Edison modeling 🙂

DIY Christmas Decor: Marble and Gold Letters

So, I told you marble contact paper was addicting. 
Last week was Thanksgiving, and despite the contentions and deep divides around us, I hope you had peace around your Thanksgiving dinner table, and you were able to be truly grateful for those with you and your many blessings.
I think “peace” is especially applicable this Christmas season. As Advent begins, the season of expectant waiting, it’s a reminder that the Prince of Peace did come to this world as a baby, and live with us. He’s the Healer, and ultimate King.
Also, I’m writing this post before Thanksgiving, and I may or may not be listening to Christmas music. Ok, I’m definitely listening to Christmas music. 
Have you seen the Christmas decorations at Target? I fell in love with the marble Christmas trees. Marble matches everything, and is so classy.
I took that marble idea, and expanded on it for these marble and gold letters!
You’ll Need: 

Step 1: Fold your contact paper so that right sides are together, like it is in the image above. 

Step 2: Then trace and cut out your letters. You may need to use a craft knife to cut out some shapes, depending on what letters you choose. “JOY” would have been a bit easier!

Step 3: Peel and stick the contact paper letters to the cardboard letters. Smooth out any bubbles under the surface. This part is the most fun!

Step 4: Paint the edges of the letters gold. I’d tried to use my copper contact paper, but without success. Paint is much easier, and I love the finished result!
Now that Thanksgiving is over, it’s now acceptable for me to take down my fall decorations and bust out the Christmas stuff. These will find a new home on my mantle. 
(And if you like that painting … I made that too, and I can post a tutorial for that also. The premise behind it is so easy, anyone could do it.)
So bust out the Christmas music with no shame, and get to spreading that Christmas cheer! Peace on earth, good will to men!

DIY: Repurposed Mirror To Chalkboard

Yes, I know that the height of the chalkboard craze was like, so 2014. Like everyone else, I wanted a giant chalkboard, but without having to paint an entire wall or pay for an expensive board. I entertained the idea of building one for a long time, but just couldn’t muster up the motivation to do that much work. And then one day, I realized that the perfect chalkboard had been right under my nose. 
Actually, I think it was hidden away in a closet. 
Ever since we moved, I couldn’t find a spot for the large mirror we’d bought with a dresser we found on the curb for $30. The dresser I eventually painted and it found a home in Edison’s room.
With a few supplies and couple hours, you can turn any large frame into a chalkboard. Here’s what you’ll need: 
  • A frame. I used a mirror, but you can also use photo frames, or framed art from Goodwill.
  • Chalkboard paint. I used chalkboard paint in a spray can originally, and eventually used chalkboard paint in a can for touch ups. Also, you can make your  own
  • Painters tape.
  • Paintbrushes for touch ups.
  • Paint for the frame. Those little samples from Lowes or Home Depot only cost a few bucks, and they’re perfect for this.
  • Sandpaper for sanding the frame.

Start by sanding your frame lightly, just to be sure your paint is going to stick well. Then, spray on your chalkboard paint. Spray from about a foot away, using a continuous sweeping motion from side to side. Go slowly so you get a nice thick coat. Let it dry according to the instructions on the can, probably about an hour. Then repeat, until you’ve covered the glass well. 
Then, use the painter’s tape to protect the chalkboard surface while you paint the frame.

Two words of caution: First, put down enough tape that you don’t paint beyond it onto the frame, or else you’ll have to touch it up. 
Secondly, be careful not to stick the paint down too well – this is the opposite of advice where you want to be sure the paint doesn’t bleed underneath. We’re just using the paint to protect the chalkboard, and in this situation, if the paint sticks to the chalkboard too much, it might pull off the chalkboard paint from the slippery glass surface beneath. Again, you might have to do some touch ups with a paintbrush. It’s not that big of a deal.

Then you need to season your board. If you skip this step, your fresh chalkboard paint will retain the outline of whatever you write on it first. To avoid ghosting, rub the side of a piece of chalk all over the surface of your chalkboard, and then rub it in before erasing it.

Hang it up, and get to work!

Another word of caution. Around Christmas, you may see some gold and silver metallic chalk markers on Amazon. You may begin dreaming about all the sparkly, glittering possibilities for how these chalkboard markers will transform your hand-lettering into a work of art. You may buy said markers, and create a masterpiece. And then discover … it will not come off. Even after googling how to get it off, and using Windex. 
It. Will. Not. Come. Off.

And that means you’ll have to repeat the steps above to paint over it. 

It may not look as pretty, but it will come off!

Do you have an inspirational message or message board chalkboard anywhere in your house? If you haven’t joined that bandwagon yet, what would you write on one? Share in the comments below or on Facebook!

Five Friday Finds 10/9

Happy Friday! Just a handful of things/blogs/shops/articles that I found inspiring, encouraging, or entertaining: 

1. The Happy Hour Podcast with Jamie Ivey. Disclaimer: I’ve only listened to one episode so far. Disclaimer to my disclaimer: that’s all it took for me to know that this podcast is excellent. It really is like sitting with your best girlfriends for happy hour, except that in this case your girlfriends are all the authors, bloggers, artists, and creative women you admire from around the whole internet. So you should gather the real life girlfriends you admire, and tell them to listen to this podcast with you, during happy hour. 

2. 4 Easy DIY Halloween Costumes and 3 Easy DIY Princess Costumes from Merrick’s Art. The Elsa dress! You guys! And the modest Ariel outfit! And don’t even get me started on the Kate Middleton costume – I could wear that every day of the year, not just for Halloween. 

3. “Make Room” Advent Calendar and Devotional from Naptime Diaries. I love Advent. Well, I should say, I love the idea of Advent. Don’t we all want to slow down and savor the true meaning of the Christmas season? I’m just really bad at it. This advent calendar and devotional would provide that motivation and accountability. Plus, it’s just pretty.

4. Life Lived Beautifully Fashion Week with Gretchen. I so enjoyed Gretchen’s series last week on fashion from a Biblical perspective. This post especially, Fashion and Real Life, is chock full of practical advice. Gretchen has a four month old, and I have an almost three month old, so if she can get dressed every day, I can too! She introduced me to several new ethical fashion brands that I’m excited to check out.

5. New and improved Decor and Storage Ideas for Your Dorm Room (And Other Small Spaces) Part one and Part 2. Can you believe that Pinterest wasn’t even really a thing when I first wrote those posts?! I’m almost considered old in blogging years. So this week I took some time (actually, a TON of time, like, days) to fix all the broken links and images for things that no longer existed, and added brand new thrifty decorating and storage ideas that you can try out really anywhere you need to maximize your storage or add a little flair.

That’s what I found this week! What about you? Let me know in the comments or on Instagram.

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Create: Embroidered Up-Cycled Onesies

Remember in grade school when that particular clothing item was absolutely the coolest thing ever, and everyone who was anyone HAD to have one? I remember the butterfly hair clip phase – those clips with glittery butterfly wings attached on springs, so they looked like they were fluttering. Everyone was wearing them. I had a light pink pair, and they were perfection. 
FYI, the must-have item for your little one today is an embroidered onesie. All the cool kids are wearing them. 
And the best part – you can DIY one, using all those onesies in excellent condition that you picked up at Goodwill, or were hand-me downs from your friend’s kids. You know, the ones that are perfectly fine on their own, but with a little stitching, go from “meh” to the envy of all the other infants in their puppy and dinosaur onesies at the mall – or pediatrician’s office. 
Ok, so maybe I made that up about embroidery being a big trend, although I have seen it around, but it should be, because it’s easy, and really does look awesome. And there’s so many cute and funny onesies I’ve seen around that I want to buy, but they cost around $25 each. This way, I can up-cycle what I have and add the extra cute factor.
You’ll need: 
  • Ordinary onesies
  • Embroidery floss
  • Embroidery needle
  • Embroidery hoop
  • Something to draw your design with. I use a washable fabric marker or even a pencil, since it washes out and even erases from the fabric sometimes.
  • Endless ideas for cute designs
I started with a hipster anchor and compass design. While I liked the color combo, it didn’t pop enough, so in the final version of this one, I added some red floss too. 

Most of my designs used a simple back-stitch. The most challenging one was the baseball onesie. This one used a modified blanket stitch. If you’d like to replicate it, here’s how: 
Go up through your fabric, leaving space for the “Y” shape of the stitch. 

Then poke down at an angle, trapping the thread underneath the needle, like the photo above shows. Then pull it through, like the photo below: 
Then stitch down to make the stem of the “Y” shape. This will join the “Y’s” together. 

 If it’s confusing from the pictures, try watching youtube videos of the blanket stitch. You’re just modifying the shape so that instead of going at a right angle, you’re creating the “Y” shape.

For this one, I sketched the design using the fabric maker. I wasn’t concerned about making the letters perfect; I like the hand-written look.

I was sorely tempted to do something Harry Potter themed for this lightening bolt one, but I was afraid the blue would pre-condition him to favor Ravenclaw. So instead, I went with “So Rad” in bubble letters for a little hipster throwback to the 80’s. 

Edison approves. And he’s definitely cool.